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Mar 12, 2015
joelpringle

Time to look at real solutions to Australia’s housing affordability crisis – ACOSS

Speaking at an affordable housing forum, ACOSS CEO Dr Cassandra Goldie called on Federal, State and local Governments to step up to the challenge of improving housing affordability in Australia, warning that we risk sentencing young people and those on low incomes to a life of insecure renting, or worse, if we fail to act now.

Read more here.

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Aug 30, 2012

AAH releases a 4-point plan to fix our housing crisis

A coalition of national housing, welfare and community sector organisations is proposing a four point plan to address affordable housing in Australia that will deliver 30,000 new affordable housing units each year and lift 250,000 households out of housing stress over five years.

The plan would deliver affordable housing options for two out of every three people currently on public and community housing waiting lists, as well as take pressure off house prices and ease demand in the private rental market. Continue reading »

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Jun 22, 2012

Rents and mortgages squeeze incomes: Census 2011

Data just released from the 2011 Census confirm what we already know: that rents and mortgages in Australia have grown faster than incomes, squeezing household budgets. Continue reading »

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May 18, 2012

WA budgets for a good start on housing

Australians for Affordable Housing have welcomed the Western Australian Government’s commitment to affordable housing in yesterday’s budget. Continue reading »

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May 11, 2012

No help for the housing stressed in Coalition’s budget reply

In last night’s budget reply speech the alternative government put forward no alternative plan for the one in ten households in housing stress, Australians for Affordable Housing said today.

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May 8, 2012

Battler’s Budget? Not so far!

Treasurer Wayne Swan has dubbed tonight’s Federal Budget a ‘battler’s budget, but without measures to address housing costs, Australians for Affordable Housing say the Budget will fail those struggling with the single biggest household expense.

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Apr 30, 2012
admin

Rental snapshot shows households locked out

New research showing that high rents are locking low income households out of Australia’s capital cities has Australians for Affordable Housing calling for an urgent increase in the rate of Commonwealth Rent Assistance.

Anglicare Australia’s Rental Affordability Snapshot surveyed the number of rental properties on the market that were affordable to people on income support payments and the minimum wage with shocking results.

“Anglicare’s Rental Affordability Snapshot shows that not one rental in Canberra, Sydney, Melbourne, Brisbane, Perth, Darwin or Adelaide was affordable to a single person receiving Newstart, Youth Allowance or Austudy,” said Australians for Affordable Housing Campaign Manager Sarah Toohey.

“Couples and singles receiving the Aged or Disability Pensions will also struggle to find an affordable rental in any  of these capital cities, where the number of affordable rental properties ranges from zero to two per cent.”

“Across the country one in five renters are in housing stress. Because of high housing costs, tenants will struggle to pay the bills, buy clothes and food, pay for transport, or any school costs for their kids.”

“These households urgently need an increase in the rate of Commonwealth Rent Assistance in the upcoming Federal Budget, to help their household budget.”

“The rental market is so dysfunctional that even working households can’t find anything affordable. Anglicare’s Snapshot shows that less than one per cent of rentals in Sydney, and two per cent in Melbourne, were affordable and appropriate for single parents earning the minimum wage.”

“Right across the country our housing system is failing. Australians for Affordable Housing is calling for an immediate increase to Commonwealth Rent Assistance as a down payment on a National Housing Plan, to make sure everyone can afford to keep a roof over their head”

Australians for Affordable Housing is a coalition of national housing, welfare and community sector organisations working to highlight the problem of housing affordability in Australia. For more information visit www.housingstressed.org.au


Media contact :  Sarah Toohey, 0427 563 989.  Follow AAH on Facebook  at www.facebook.com/housingstressed and Twitter: @housingstressed

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Mar 16, 2012
admin

Affordable housing key to a sustainable city

Good planning plus affordable housing equals a liveable city (The Age, Comment 16/3) offers a serious challenge to the Government to address housing affordability – and it comes well overdue.

Housing is the biggest cost of living issue in Australia, with one in ten households under housing stress. As Whitzman and Giles-Corti correctly note, it’s the search for affordable housing that’s pushed families to the edges of the city. While they say this issue goes beyond the supply of housing, it’s a central problem that cannot be ignored.

The Baillieu Government must heed this warning when developing its new metropolitan strategy and make sure Melbourne has a plan to deliver more affordable housing.

The Federal Government can help by creating a Growth Fund with an annual allocation of $2.5 billion a year to provide 100,000 affordable homes over five years, across the country, and the state government should match their fair share.

Housing affordability is not an easy fix, but it is not impossible. The time to address this worsening crisis is in the upcoming State and Federal Budgets and not a moment later.

By Australians for Affordable Housing Campaign Manager, Sarah Toohey

Australians for Affordable Housing is a coalition of national housing, welfare and community sector organisations to highlight the problem of housing affordability in Australia. For more information visit
www.housingstressed.org.au

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Mar 16, 2012
admin

Candidates offer no relief as Queensland mining boom forces rents to rise

Renters in regional Queensland are experiencing massive increases in rents due to the mining boom and Australians for Affordable Housing is calling on candidates in the election to act to ensure that regional communities do not become too expensive to live in.

New analysis from Australians for Affordable Housing using bond data show that Western Downs, Gladstone, Rockhampton and Mackay council areas are all seeing massive increases- of up to 46 per cent- in rents for both houses and flats in the 12 months from 2010 to 2011.

The biggest increases were for 2 bedroom flats in Gladstone (up 46 per cent) followed by 3 bedroom houses in Gladstone (up 44 per cent). Two bedroom flats in Western Downs rose by 33 per cent and in Mackay by 15 per cent and Rockhampton by 14 per cent. A full list is attached.

“Growth in mining is helping to support employment but rising rents have an impact on entire communities regardless of whether they are benefiting from the boom,” said Sarah Toohey campaign manager for Australians for Affordable Housing

“With over 9,000 renters in these towns in housing stress, rising rents only push struggling families further out, away from jobs. This leaves mining towns without essential service staff.

“Queensland needs communities that have affordable housing for everyone, yet none of the major parties have released election policies to fix the rental market. Australians for Affordable Housing is calling on both major parties to commit to increasing the supply of affordable rental housing.

“These are policies Queensland desperately needs if regional communities are to be places of opportunity and not simply where those with high paying mining jobs can afford to live,”

Queensland regions with fastest rent increases

Darling Downs

2 bedroom flat 3 Bedroom house
Rent ($) New Bonds Change Dec 2010 to Dec 2011 Rent ($) New Bonds Change Dec 2010 to Dec 2011
Western Downs Regional Council $ 250 52 32% $300 149 13%
Toowoomba Regional Council $ 210 337 5% $ 275 596 6%

 

Central Queensland

2 bedroom flats 3 bedroom houses
Locality Rent ($) New Bonds Lodged Change Dec 2010 to Dec 2011 Rent ($) New Bonds Lodged Change Dec 2010 to Dec 2011
Gladstone Regional Council area $350 136 46% $460 235 44%
Rockhampton Regional Council Area $250 262 14% $325 423 8%

 
Northern Queensland

2 bedroom flats 3 bedroom houses
Locality Rent ($) New Bonds Lodged Change Dec 2010 to Dec 2011 Rent ($) New Bonds Lodged Change Dec 2010 to Dec 2011
Mackay Regional Council Area $ 450 355 15% $ 330 239 12%


 

Australians for Affordable Housing is a coalition of national housing, welfare and community sector organisations working to highlight the problem of housing affordability in Australia. For more information visit www.housingstressed.org.au

Spokesperson: Sarah Toohey, 0427 563 989 Media enquiries: Stephanie De Campo, 0432 828 004

Follow AAH on Facebook and Twitter: @housingstressed

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Mar 16, 2012
admin

Rent rises pricing families out, as 34,000 struggle with rents. Affordable rentals must be key in this election campaign: AAH

Families in over 60 per cent of Brisbane suburbs have seen rents in their area increase above inflation in the last year. With over 34,000 renters in Brisbane in housing stress Australians for Affordable Housing is calling on candidates in the Queensland election to invest in affordable housing to make sure that Brisbane families do not get priced out of their local community.

New analysis from Australians for Affordable Housing using bond data show that renters in the inner north and northwest faced the steepest increases, with rent hikes of 8 per cent and 9 per cent respectively.  A full list is attached.

“New rents in Ashgrove, Dorrington and St John’s Wood rose by 12 per cent in the last year and by 9 per cent in Alderley, Enogerra and Grange” said Sarah Toohey Campaign Manager for Australians for Affordable Housing.

“Suburbs like Teneriffe and New Farm saw the asking price for new rentals rise by a whopping 39 per cent, (but with low transaction volumes in these areas these statistics may not give the full picture)” 

“It’s clear that the market is not delivering affordable housing to the majority of renters in Brisbane and yet struggling renters have not heard one word from either party in this election campaign that would help ease their housing stress.

“I don’t know many people who received a 9 per cent pay rise last year but many renters in the inner north west received a pretty hefty rental increase, it’s simply not sustainable,”

“With the election battleground in the suburbs of Brisbane we hope to see parties compete to deliver the best housing policy and not simply let Brisbane residents suffer rising rents.  Now is the time to promise new affordable rentals to boost the supply of housing.

Australians for Affordable Housing is a coalition of national housing, welfare and community sector organisations working  to highlight the problem of housing affordability in Australia. For more information visit www.housingstressed.org.au

Spokesperson: Sarah Toohey, 0427 563 989/ Media enquiries: Stephanie De Campo, 0432 828 004 

Follow AAH on Facebook and Twitter: @housingstressed

Rent increases by Brisbane regions

 

North West – Inner  8.7%
North – Inner 7.5%
North West – Outer 6.9%
City Inner 5.3%
South – Inner 5.3%
South West – Inner 5.0%
South East – Inner 4.8%
North – Outer 4.2%
South – Outer 2.9%
Bayside 2.7%
South West – Outer 1.4%
South East – Outer -3.8%

Brisbane suburbs rent increase league table

  Number of lettings 3 bedroom  house % change in rents
New Farm/Teneriffe 21 39%
Anstead/Bellbowrie/Moggill 14 29%
Brisbane City/Spring Hill 17 17%
Northgate 17 16%
Kuraby 12 14%
Buranda/Dutton Park/Wooloongabba 23 12%
Ashgrove/Dorrington/St Johns Wood 35 12%
Milton/Paddington/Rosalie 54 11%
Ballymore/Ithaca/Kelvin Grove/Red Hill 37 11%
Highgate Hill/South Bris/West End 29 10%
Greenslopes/Stones Corner 32 10%
Eight Miles Plains/Runcorn 43 10%
Archerfield/Coopers Plains 16 9%
Alderley/Enogerra/Gaythorne/Grange/ Newmarket/Wilston 77 9%
Bardon/Jubilee/Rainworth 20 9%
Banyo/Nudgee/Virginia 35 8%
The Gap 27 8%
Aspley/Boondal/Geebung/Zillmere 116 7%
Doboy/Hemant 10 7%
Chelmer/Indooroopilly/Taringa 53 7%
Clifton Hill/Moorooka/Tennyson 53 7%
Lota/Manly 55 7%
Balmoral/Bulimba/Hawthorne 47 6%
Annerley/Fairfield 40 6%
Chermside/Craigslea 43 6%
Brookside/Everton Park/McDowall/Stafford 151 6%
Arana Hills/Keperra 45 6%
Mansfield/Mt Gravatt/Wishart 137 5%
Calamvale/Drewvale/Stretton 16 5%
Gordon Park/Kedron 45 5%
Ekibin/Holland Park/Tarragindi/Wellers Hill 94 5%
Belmont 5 5%
Camp Hill/Carina/Carindale 113 5%
Brookfield/Chapel Hill/Kenmore 47 5%
Cannon Hill/Morningside/Norman Park 96 5%
East Bris/Kangaroo Point 36 5%
Bracken Ridge/Brighton/Deagon/Sandgate 113 4%
Nundah/Toombul/Wavell Heights 66 4%
Forest Lake/Carole Park 105 3%
Salisbury 27 3%
Algester/Parkinson 26 3%
Jindalee/MtOmmaney/Sumner/Westlake 61 3%
Lindum/Lytton/Wynnum 90 3%
Corinda/Graceville/Oxley/Sherwood 85 3%
Bowen Hills/Valley/Herston/Newstead 9 2%
Ascot/Hamilton 19 2%
Tingalpa 15 1%
Fitzgibbon/Taigum 16 1%
Coorparoo 33 1%
Auchenflower/MtCootha/Toowong 46 1%
Clayfield/Hendra 37 0%
Lutwyche/Windsor/Wooloowin 52 0%
Brisbane Market/Rocklea 15 0%
Altandi/Macgregor/Robertson/Sunnybank 83 0%
Acacia Ridge/Larapinta/Willawong 40 0%
Doolandella/Durack/Inala/Richlands 72 0%
Darra/Wacol 27 -2%
Murarrie 7 -3%
Seventeen Mile Rocks/Sinnamon Park 17 -3%
Albion/Breakfast Creek 10 -5%
Bald Hills 13 -7%
Yeronga 20 -7%
Ironside/St Lucia 13 -8%
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